T.F. Exemplifies a Rap Professional on “Unprofessional Shit”

Unprofessional Shit by T.F.

“This that automatic kill shit/This that fuck a hook, this that real shit”

These are words you won’t find very commonly when trying to make it in the rap industry. Essentially, Hip Hop today is packed full with bangers with powerful bass, arpeggiated hi hats, and most importantly a catchy hook. Although this formula makes for a good radio hit, it masks lyricism, storytelling, and the messages that rappers are trying to get out. In other words, even in their own music they are unable to be fully heard. The solution, however, is simply to take away those elements and leave room for the artist to speak. “Unprofessional Shit” by T.F. does that and more.

Story | Nico Blitz

Coming off of the Blank Face Tour with his Los Angeles conglomerate in ScHoolboy Q and Traffic, T.F. doesn’t know how to take a day off as he promotes his new single “Unprofessional Shit” with a music video that undeniably compliments the song. It’s simple. We’re also put in a position to focus on his words, rather than the beat, similarly to how we’re meant to focus on him (the lone person in the video) than any distraction in the background.

As cliché as it sounds, “Unprofessional Shit” is a reminder to be you. Think of the song in terms of a job interview. When you walk into the interview you immediately put on a professional persona from the way you dress and the way you talk, all to maintain the impression that you’re the right fit. T.F. throws a middle finger when it comes to this, simply because he believes he can break into the industry without sugarcoating his music.

More than half of the song contains bars that start off with “This that…” which leads into a metaphor pertaining to his skill level:

“This that classic Ray Allen, Supersonics/This that Super Saiyan in that hyperbolic”

And just like a job interview, you’ve got to come prepared by knowing exactly who you are and what you offer.

Relating back to the Hip Hop industry, T.F. seems adamant on his ‘no hooks’ music. It revives Hip Hop to its beginning stages where emcees would get on a track to spit a hot 16 bars and call it a day. As risky as it seems to make it big in the new sounds of the industry, we’re confident T.F. has more than enough juice to popularize his style and reformat the game.

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